Partridge Island Geology

In this third Partridge Island video, Gerald Gloade shares some more detail about the amazing geology of the island, including the fossils that can be found along the shoreline of the adjacent mainland.

The geology of Partridge Island is amazing. The volcanic rocks contain minerals that can be found in similar rocks on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean including amethyst, agate, and zeolites. The Island provided nearly every type of rock and mineral that the Mi’kmaq used in the past–and many we use today. The shoreline west of Partridge Island is also an excellent place to find fossils (although these must not be removed from their original locations per Nova Scotia Provincial legislation). Gerald Gloade shares the fascinating history and geology of Partridge Island film.

The West Bay Formation extends along the shoreline west of Partridge Island for about 800m. The formation contains a thick section of finer black sediment with minor sandy units. Pelecypod (clam shells) and ostracod (water fleas) shells are found in this section as shown above. These fossils represent periods of deeper water (lakes). Image courtesy of Ken Adams, Fundy Geological Museum.

The West Bay Formation extends along the shoreline west of Partridge Island for about 800m. The formation contains a thick section of finer black sediment with minor sandy units…

Tracks made by early four-legged animals called tetrapods can be found along the shoreline west of Partridge Island. The traces may have been made by early amphibians, as the sediments in this section predate the Joggins Formation, which is known to host the earliest reptile fossils. The traces were left in muddy sediments. It is likely that these sediments were periodically covered by shallow water, as some tracks and drag marks suggest the animal was swimming. Image courtesy of Ken Adams, Fundy Geological Museum.

Tracks made by early four-legged animals called tetrapods can be found along the shoreline west of Partridge Island. The traces may have been made by early amphibians, as the sediments…

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