L’mu’juiktuk Cape d’Or

In this video, Gerald Gloade shares some of the stories about Cape d’Or—one of the most storied places in Mi’kma’ki.

The towering cliffs of Cape d’Or extend out into the Bay of Fundy, west of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. It is said that explorer Samuel de Champlain named this point Cap d’Or (Arm of Gold) in the 1600s because of the golden colour of the copper shining in the cliffs. For the Mi’kmaq, it was the veins of hard and dense rock found in these basalt cliffs, as well as the copper, that had great value.

Gerald Gloade holds a piece of chocolate chert in his hands—a toolstone found at Cape d’Or.

Gerald Gloade holds a piece of chocolate chert in his hands—a toolstone found at Cape d’Or.

Minerals like chocolate chert (shown below) found in these cliffs are ideal for tool making. Chert is “knappable,” meaning it can be chipped and flaked to make sturdy, sharp-edged tools like scrapers, projectile points and knives.

Evidence of stone knapping by our ancestors can still be found on these beaches today.

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